Catching Up With My Honeys, Part 1

Honey Pot Bee blocks, that is! I confess, last month’s RSC17 “colour” being mixed-colour prints threw me a bit. How was I going to make that work with my Kona Graphite blocks? I dithered over it a lot, but without actually bothering to look at the options I had. Eventually, I hit the craft room and pulled out the relevant basket and Tula Pink’s Chipper stripes leapt out and sat on my face, dragging some snappy coordinating chevrons with them. Sold!

Thus, my version of Audrey’s Stripey Stripe block came to be! This was a really nice easy block to tick off the list. Looks good with all the rest, too. I may add some sashing at a later date, but for now I’ll leave that decision until I’ve made all the blocks I’m going to.

You can see that I’ve also completed a 2017 block by Patty of Elm Street Quilts for this set, with Kona Graphite as the background and four different Shimmer 2 metallic prints for the numbers. I like it – visible but understated, you can see it but it doesn’t drag attention from the actual blocks. When I realised that it finished at the same width as Molli’s #SewRoyal block, well! The two just had to be joined together.

I have a second copy printed out to go with the light-background blocks I’ve made (which I have mentally started to refer to as “Picnic in the Park”), it’s on my to-do list!

Lastly, for now, here is my version of the Starry Sky block designed by Kylie of A Persevering Mom chosen by Kitty of Night Quilter.

As you can see, I had fun with this one! When I downloaded the pattern and saw that one option finished at 2-1/2″ and another finished at 12″, my mind started whirling. Would, I wondered, the smallest block tuck into the centre of the largest? I printed and measured and…. YES! It TOTALLY would! I dug out my most starry scraps and made up four of the small version first, then assembled four of the largest version (with some slight modifications – I really don’t like paper-piecing large rectilinear shapes that I can rotary cut perfectly well and with arguably less waste) and put the whole lot together. For the most part, the blocks joined pretty well, though I did need to unpick and realign the small centre blocks once. Unfortunately I didn’t have nearly enough of the gold stars on cream fabric for all the blocks (I only just about had enough for two), so I substituted in some gold squiggles. I briefly considered mixing up both backgrounds in each block, but then decided that that would be far more distracting than two blocks of each background type. I think I was right.

I’m pretty happy with how it sits with the other Picnic blocks, too. 🙂

I’m currently working on the remaining Honey Pot Bee blocks (plus maybe a couple of unscheduled extras because I like ’em and it’s MY quilt, dammit!), hope to share them soon. 🙂

With Love… – March #TheHoneyPotBee Mod

Here is my block mod for #TheHoneyPotBee #AsYouWishBlock by Alida of Tweety Loves Quilting. It was inspired by Alida’s own suggestion for a border for the envelope block – I saw those lovely Flying Geese and my mind started flying too!  I’ve often wanted to play with “wonky” Flying Geese because so many of the designs with them are so striking, and I wanted to show that this was a letter with love in it, so I tweaked my Geese to slowly evolve into hearts.

You will need:

  • A completed #AsYouWishBlock, made with Alida’s pattern found here
  • The Flying Hearts pdf pattern, found here
  • Your usual sewing paraphernalia
  • Fabric for the Flying Hearts (scraps work well for these)
  • Fabric for the background
    • Cut a rectangle 4-1/2″ x 5-1/4″ from your background fabric before you start
  • A rotary cutter, cutting mat and quilting ruler
  • Clover wonder clips or similar (optional, but they do make life SO much easier!)
  • Embroidery thread and needle (optional)

All seam allowances are 1/4″ unless otherwise noted. Familiarity with the foundation-piecing technique is assumed.

Piecing

First, download the pdf of the paper pattern and print it out. Seam allowances are already included in the pattern and do not need to be added.

IMPORTANT!  Make sure that you print the pattern in landscape format with no scaling or at 100%, and use the 1″ square to make sure that the block has printed at the right size, or it will not fit the #AsYouWishBlock!

Cut out sections A-G, and note the layout and piecing as shown in the coloured image and described below.

  • Section A – A1, A5, A8, A11, A14, A17 and A20 are Geese, all other pieces are background.
  • Section B – B1 and B3 are the Arrow, all other pieces are background.
  • Section C – C1 and C4 are the Arrow, all other pieces are background.
  • Section D – D1 and D5 are the Heart, all other pieces are background.
  • Section E – E1 and E5 are the Heart, all other pieces are background.
  • Section F – F1 and F5 are the Heart, all other pieces are background.
  • Section G – G1 and G5 are the Heart, all other pieces are background.

TIP! You may have noticed that this mod has some pretty small pieces in some of the sections. Don’t panic! Make sure you cut a bit of fabric that will cover that piece and that is generous enough for you to handle comfortably. After all, it will be trimmed to size during piecing and you may even be able to use the offcuts for another area! 🙂

Piece all sections using your preferred foundation-piecing method. Join D>C, then DC>B, then DCB>A. Join E>F>G. You should now have two rectangles ABCD (4-1/2″ x 14-1/2″) and EFG (4-1/2″ x 5-3/4″). Do not remove the paper until the entire #AsYouWishBlock has been fully assembled.

Embroidery (Optional)

If you would like to embroider something on the top-left rectangle, do so before assembling your block. A blank “template” rectangle is given in the pattern pdf for you to draw and/or write on… as you wish! You can then use your preferred fabric-marking method to transfer your design onto the 4-12″ x 5-1/4″ rectangle of background fabric (I used a window as a “light-box” and traced my letters with a fine pen), then embroider it with the thread and stitches of your choice. If you need a lil inspiration, I highly recommend checking out Mary Corbett’s Embroidered Letters lessons. She also has a wonderful array of different stitch tutorials if you want to try something new. 🙂

Block Assembly

Join the 4-1/2″ x 5-1/4″ rectangle of background fabric (with or without embroidery) to section EFG.

Join this to the top of the #AsYouWishBlock.

Join section ABCD to the right-hand side of the #AsYouWishBlock to complete the Flying Hearts design.

Enjoy your letter, sent with love!  🙂

The Crystal Crown – February #TheHoneyPotBee Mod

After the very positive response my modification of the #SewRoyalBlock got on #TheHoneyPotBee Facebook group, I asked Molli about the idea of sharing the pattern for it and got an extremely supportive thumbs-up, so here it is – a foundation-pieced band of glittering jewels to adorn your crown.  Rainbows optional, but fabulous!

You will need:

  • The pdf of the pattern, found here
  • Molli Sparkles’ pattern for the #SewRoyalBlock, found here
  • Your usual sewing paraphernalia
  • Fabric for the “diamonds”
    • approx. 3″ x 2″ scraps work well for this; note that the central diamond is longer than the others!
  • Fabric for the background
    • a 5″ strip cut from a fat quarter should be more than enough
    • cut two 1″ x 4″ strips from your background fabric before you start foundation piecing
  • A rotary cutter, cutting mat and quilting ruler
  • Clover wonder clips or similar (optional, but they do make life SO much easier!)

All seam allowances are 1/4″ unless otherwise noted. Familiarity with the foundation-piecing technique is assumed.

Assembly

First, download the pdf of the paper pattern and print it out. Seam allowances are already included in the pattern and do not need to be added.

IMPORTANT!  Make sure that you print the pattern in landscape format with no scaling or at 100%, and use the 1″ square to make sure that the block has printed at the right size, or it will not fit the #SewRoyalBlock!

Cut out sections A-G and note the piecing order and layout as shown in the coloured diagram. Piece 1 in each section is the coloured diamond; all other pieces are the background fabric.

Piece the sections using your preferred foundation-piecing method, then join them in the order A>B>C>D>E>F>G. The clips are really helpful for holding sections together and flat as you join them. Do not remove the paper until the entire #SewRoyalBlock is completely assembled.

Take the two 1″ x 4″ rectangles of background fabric and join them to the short edges of your jewelled band as shown below. Use the ruler and rotary cutter to trim the strips level with the top and bottom of the band (see diagram).

Your finished band should measure 3″ high and 8-1/2″ long.

Now, get on over to Molli’s place and follow the instructions there to assemble your #SewRoyalBlock, using your jewelled band in place of the horizontal gold-and-purple band.

Stand back and admire your beautiful new crown!  🙂

The Honey Pot Bee – March Blocks

How did it become March so fast? Moreover, how did it get to be almost the middle of March so fast?! That’s just rude, that is.

Anyway, I managed to finish my March Honey Pot Bee blocks over the last couple of days, so I can show them off now. 🙂

First up is the Echo block by Amy Garro of 13 Spools.

These blocks went together so quickly and smoothly that I didn’t take any progress pics! Despite (or perhaps because of) its elegant simplicity, this block gave me a lot to ponder as I tried to fit it into my “scrappy, RSC17+contrast colour” theme for some of the Honey Pot Bee blocks. This month’s RSC17 colour is red, for which the contrast colour is green. Although I like Christmas colours, I wanted to avoid a very “Christmas” vibe for these blocks, which meant very careful selection of the green – tricky, since I love dark forest greens and consequently have a lot of them! Going completely scrappy was an option, but I liked the colour contrast between the two halves and wasn’t sure I had enough different red fabrics to pull off the look I wanted. I briefly considered making one half of each block green, but then decided that was less of a highlight and more of a direct competitor for the red. In the end, I decided to use two different reds in each block, and “tie” the blocks together by using the same greens in each. Even while making the blocks, I came up with still more ways I could have approached it. Part of me is still pondering whether I should try and make some of the other variations I considered! However, I’m pretty pleased with these ones, especially the way that solid red vibrates against the grey background, and they look pretty smart next to the other blocks in this “family”:

I think I did the right thing. 🙂

Next up is the As You Wish block by Alida of Tweety Loves Quilting. I had a LOT of fun with this one! I really like foundation (or paper) piecing and have really started to explore the possibilities of my own paper-pieced designs, so when I saw the Flying Geese as a “serving suggestion” in the original pattern, I couldn’t resist having a play with the idea and taking it a little further. I drew up an encircling string of Flying Geese in Inkscape, then tweaked them so that they gradually became Hearts that are either floating into or out of the envelope, depending on how you view it:

The blank space on the left looked rather bare, so I decided to embroider the words “With love…” on it in a pretty font – more on that below!

Although the Geese in the layout are all the same colour, I decided to do an ombre look in the real thing, running from blue through purple to red:

The Geese pieced really well despite having some quite dinky bits, and I was really pleased with how they framed the envelope block:

Being a bit of a Doctor Who fan, I couldn’t resist making the envelope Tardis Blue and lined with stars. I don’t think that’s the Doctor’s handwriting, though… 🙁

The embroidery took the longest, partly because of decisions I made. I chose a font that was not very complex, but also wasn’t a very thin line, so it had to be filled in somehow:

I used a red Frixon pen to trace the font onto my background fabric, then set it up in a plastic clip frame:

Not sure how much I like this frame, it was quite difficult to get much tension on the fabric without the clips coming undone. I don’t think I’d want to use it for Srs Embroidery.

My next poor decision was to use pink-and-purple variegated rayon to do the letters in satin stitch. The thread colour doesn’t go well with any of the other block colours and embroidering with the rayon proved quite a fiddle! If I did this block over, this is the bit I would do very differently. However, I didn’t have much of the background fabric left so I persevered with it, and the final block is not too bad, even if it’s not what I would choose with hindsight!

And you’re going to laugh at me now, but I didn’t know Frixion pens erased with the heat of an iron! I’d only chosen them because of the fine line they draw:

My careful marks to indicate the corners of the embroidered area vanished along with the creases I was trying to get rid of after I unframed the fabric – whoops! Instead I had to use a quilting ruler to get the text reasonably central when I trimmed it down. This block was a real learning experience in so many ways. Overall though, when it sits with its Bee mates, I think it looks pretty good.  🙂

I still don’t quite know what the destination is, but GOLLY I am enjoying the journey!  🙂