Surprise Success! Shibori Hanabi

My Shibori Hanabi wall hanging was born of a desire to try my hand at shibori with different colours. I started it about 18 months ago, stitching out the design, then “pulling up” each section, dyeing the piece, pulling up the next section, dyeing again… and so on, until the whole design was completely dyed, about 5-6 dyeing stages iirc!

I subsequently got a couple of books on shibori and discovered a lot of things I’d had to teach myself through trial and error!  I had no idea what, if anything, would remain of my original stitched design when I unpicked the shibori stitches, but in the event I was really pleased with how the different shapes came out, and the different colours were apparent, too.

For the backing, I used a “chunk” (technical term!) of cotton fabric that came from mum’s stash, mostly white but with flowers printed on it. It went through all the same dyeing phases as the shibori piece did, so that the front and back would tie together well.

I made a start on the quilting, using Glide thread, and was finding it an interesting but concentration-intensive process to define the shapes and textures left by the stitching and dyeing. Then other, more pressing projects popped up and I set it aside for some time while I focussed on other things. I did briefly toy with trying to finish it for the FoQ, but it was not big enough for the standard categories and I didn’t want to start adding borders where not needed, so I shelved that idea.

A couple of months ago, however, someone posted on the UKQU facebook group about the Scottish Quilting Show having extended the entry deadline and out of curiosity I checked the website to see what the categories and rules were. The lower size limit for “standard” quilts was smaller and I realised my shibori piece would be suitable – if I cracked on with quilting it! One entry form later and I had a month to finish the quilting and get it to the organisers by the Feb 25th deadline. I was also looking after my post-operative brother-in-law while mum helped my sister with her two small children; it became quite a challenge to sneak in quilting when I could! Somehow, though, I managed to get it finished and decided to face it instead of using a binding, a technique I’d never tried before! I love how it looks, though.

Proudly, I bundled it up and posted it off, and was relieved to get the confirmation of receipt email. I didn’t hear anything subsequently and family commitments made it impossible to get up to Glasgow to attend the show, so it wasn’t until someone very kindly posted some photos from the show on FB that I learned that it had been placed 2nd in the Contemporary category! I’m thrilled and I’m really looking forward to getting the judges’ comments back along with my quilt.

Crane Wall Hanging – Finished!

Hooray!

hanging_0202_1

The Origami Crane wall hanging is finished, bound, labelled and on its way to its new home in Kentucky!  🙂  (It is straight, I promise – it’s just the pole is sitting cock-eyed!)

The cranes were quilted in the ditch initially, then I used FMQ in Wonderfil metallic thread on the cream background and in light green cotton on the circle fabric.  Each crane’s background is a different filler:

The metallic Wonderfil was… ok to use, I think, but as with the other metallic threads I’ve tried, it has some serious sproing factor.  I found it was forever climbing off the reel and wrapping itself around bits of sewing machine with disastrous effect, and I got quite good at spotting when this happened *before* it broke the thread or the needle.  The next time I use metallic thread, I’m going to stick a long straw or something over the first bobbin thread guide on the Pfaff.  That thing is almost more trouble than it’s worth…!

Because I thought Alison (the recipient) had done such a beautiful job on the bracelets, I also made her a bonus cushion cover from the left-overs:

hanging_0202_2

It’s 16″ square and quilted simply with a diamond pattern.  I hope she likes it!  🙂

This photo is a much better representation of the colours:

hanging_0202_3

The cranes I’ve made here are a smaller version (finishing at 8″ square), but you can find a pattern and tutorial for a 12″ version here.  🙂

Linking up with Free-Motion Mavericks and TGIFF!  🙂

Craft Swap!

A friend from an online game and I decided to do a craft swap before Christmas.  She’s a very clever beader and made me three truly fabulous bracelets.

In return, I am making her a wall hanging using my Paper Crane pattern.  I hope she likes it!

swap_2401_4

I re-sized the pattern from the original 12″ finished block down to 8″ finished, which was more manageable (and meant I could fit more of the pieces onto one page of printer paper).  Then I picked out my fabrics and set to!  After some humming and hawing, I ended up with four pairs of fabrics I liked, and decided to make four cranes.  The set-in triangles are fabric I originally bought to make box bags with, but the slightly oriental feel and the colours went so well that I couldn’t resist using it for this project!

swap_2401_5

Then a house move/Christmas/New Year/work happened and I didn’t manage to make much more progress until the last couple of weeks, when this project has leapt forward again.

Craft goes in craft place; unfortunately, so did everything else...
Craft goes in craft place; unfortunately, so did everything else…

I’m now busy quilting it and hope to be able to send it off to its new home in Kentucky very soon!  🙂

Linking up with Monday Making!